REVOLTING PEASANTS

By Oleksandra Levina “This March the Russian Revolution is going to celebrate its 100th anniversary. One hundred years ago Russia was shaken by a series of revolutions, which lead to an end of the Tsarist Rule.” Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932 is an exhibition held at the Royal Academy of Arts. It explores one of the…

FEMINISM AND MEDIA AT TATE ★★

By Sixtine Marion Tate Modern fails to move its public into the feminist movement, and gives the impression it was just a room to fill. When you walk into Feminism and media at the Tate Modern you see art showing only women in a very small room. The lack of harmony between the different artwork, and…

TEASER: GET AWAY WITH ART

By Karina Andrianova Be Banksy or be arrested. Watch your back or hide in Shoreditch because street art is a fast track to jail in Britain.  While Banksy makes millions selling his pieces, many young street artists are awaiting a court’s decision for expressing themselves in the exact same way. So, is street art a…

PADRE DELLA POP ART

By Karina Andrianova Eduardo Paolozzi’s exhibition is now on at the Whitechapel Gallery, London. Until 14 May visitors can see over 250 works including screen prints, collages and sculptures by the ‘Godfather’ of Pop Art. The artist, who would have turned 93 this March, is famous for transforming British post-war art. He was a co-founder…

USE PAINT NOT GUNS

By Chloe Darnaud There you are hazily staring at a fully black canvas at Tate Modern wondering about the purpose of art. People behind you are carefully examining each corner of the painting, nodding approvingly and making comments about Pierre Soulages’ genius. You can hear them murmuring on how light is coming out of his…

BREXIT IS MAKING A SPLASH

By Chloe Darnaud Brexit has been damaging British art sales, experts say. Sally Kalman, who runs London’s Crane Kalman gallery, explains: “Transporting paintings around Europe will get more complicated. We may have to pay extra VAT and maybe five per cent import duty. I think the whole thing will make business more complicated.” And Reg…

THE LONDON ARTISTS STRUGGLE

By Chloe Darnaud During the 1960s, dock closures left East London riddled with derelict buildings, which became relatively cheap places for artists to install their studios in. The art scene then began to thrive. A number of galleries opened, attracting dealers, collectors, artists and art students. Today, London’s East end counts more than 200 art…